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Posts Tagged ‘Arts’

“Getting Comfy” from Kayla Jackson

In Internship on June 24, 2015 at 11:00 AM

Admin Hallway

As I am getting more comfortable here, I am noticing the different ways people act with one another. While I imagined my first time in a business setting to be very cut throat and strict, I am happy to say that this is not the case at all. It is a joy to sit at the end of the hall and listen all day to the muffled voices behind office doors that more than often end in laughter. It is clear to me that these people here live in a very special culture where work is not work. It is life. This does not mean they all overwork so much that they have no life (although I am constantly impressed by how much people here put in the extra effort to be great) but rather they do not come to “work” as much as they come to just another part of their life.

The sense of community here is much greater than other theatre settings I have found myself in. I have been in many environments where everybody is there to build themselves up and eventually surpass their colleagues. OSF stands apart from these places in the fact that no one is trying to outdo each other. They all work together to strive for the same overall goals. Someone working here can take comfort in the fact that no one is waiting for them to make the wrong move and can therefore work in peace and reach their highest level of excellence. I hope I can always be in this type of environment.

“Spraying and Relocating!” from Randy Wong-Westbrooke

In Assistantship, Scenic Paint on May 27, 2015 at 11:31 PM

Wong-Westbrooke_Sprayer

This last week has been full of new things. Scenic art is full of so many tricks and techniques to achieve the faux finishes and textures we create onstage. To recreate the texture and sheen of a rod iron fence, we mixed graphite with black paint and applied the gloppy mixture onto the wooden cutout. Once dry, you’d sand away and most of the graphite remains giving that sheen. A coat of sealer is needed unless you want the graphite to rub off on everyone’s hands and costumes.

Next with my final design for the Juneteenth Banner getting approved on Friday, we started to mix colors and put them into air powered paint spray guns. I only worked with a spray gun once last summer at Cal Shakes, but I will say that I hardly remember anything. There are a lot of bits and pieces to keep track of when assembling the gun and a few knobs that control the amount of air being used, the amount of paint, and the nozzle. It will definitely take practice. Next we learned out to square a drop on the paint frame – also a new tool and method. Because the banner is long, but narrow, we got a feel for how to spray on paint evenly on the excess muslin underneath the final.  However, even before we started on the final we had to learn how to drive the lifts. Having not driven a car in nine months it was hard to get back into it with no help from the joystick controls. Once we were lined up though, I will say I was more comfortable spraying than driving.

This project is on hold until I return after this week. For the main season set pieces, the paint shop has not been overwhelmed the last couple weeks and my charge, Gabriel, has set me up with Rick Anderson in the Scenic Design Studio to help him with some model boxes. I also haven’t built any model boxes in about eight-nine months so I was nervous. I was expecting him to say this is how I want you to build a ¼” model of the Bowmer, but instead he gave me the printouts and two already built, yet slightly different older boxes to compare with. I was free to go about it however I wanted and that is liberating, yet also nerve wracking. It took some getting used to being in a different space without the tools I’m familiar with. I did discover, however, that the larger shell of the theater is fairly similar to the proscenium stage we have back at Ithaca College, minus the proscenium part obviously. Today I will probably be working on making the clouds above the stage and the walls with boxes for lighting on the sides of the theater. It’s really neat to look around at Richard Hay’s immense collection of art, history, theater, and design books filling up the shelves around me while I hold some glued pieces together to dry. Let’s hope I’m keeping up a good pace!

It’s Getting Interesting… from Azalea Micketti

In Azalea Micketti, Internship, Stage Management on May 26, 2013 at 12:53 PM

I am so fascinated by the daily change in the rehearsal room. Some days it is smooth as butter, easy as making tea. Everything clicks, everyone is in sync, it’s quick, efficient, and organized. Other days it is like wading through a bog. Nothing lines up, words don’t make sense, time moves slowly and talking is painful. It is at these times that you truly see the nature of our human experience. Everyone reacts differently, experiences differently, copes differently. I have learned so much all ready, not just about theatre, but about being an adult. About letting go, not taking things personally, knowing when to hold your tongue, and understanding that someone else’s bad day doesn’t have to effect yours. Emotions run so high and it is so important to be respectful of the individual’s process as well as the collective exploration that takes place.

More than anything, this internship has only increased my desire to be an actor, a writer, and even a director. I want to continue to experience life through theatre, and share that with others. But more than that, it has begun to teach me what sort of person I want to be, what sort of art I want to create, and what sort of relationships I want to cultivate. I think it is so important to maintain artistic integrity in everything you do, no matter how ridiculous it is. For the first time I actually like The Taming of the Shrew, and I attribute a lot of that to the attention to detail and the importance of story that has been beautifully encouraged by the director and incredibly well manifested by the entire company.

“What’s the Password?” from Danielle Leigh Hicks

In Internship on January 29, 2013 at 4:15 PM

Danielle Leigh Hicks Photo Week 1

This is the unspoken phrase that I anticipated I would hear upon starting my internship with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s lighting department. There is a general understanding that every department, at every company, everywhere has their own language and camaraderie amongst employees. This can be difficult to mesh with upon becoming the “new person”. This is what haunted me as I entered the light shop on my first day at OSF. I expected to see the faces of those much more experienced than I, looking down at me with the expression of “Are you really one of us?”

THIS IS NOT WHAT HAPPENED AT ALL.

While I was already acquainted with Michael Maag, the Head of the Lighting and Video Projection Departments at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, I was not familiar with any of the other lighting employees. To my surprise, they welcomed me with open arms and a wrench in hand, guiding me through my first few days in a way that was most helpful and educational. Everyone who I have met thus far in this company has been warm and welcoming, showing me that no matter what, I can go to anyone for help or just to chat about my day. It is a place that I would recommend to any theatre professional – young or old, experienced or not – to come to learn and to teach and to grow. It is a place that I have dreamed of coming to for many years, and I am incredibly excited to roll up my sleeves and get to work helping to create some of the most inspiring and passionate theatre in the country.

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