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Archive for the ‘Scenic Paint’ Category

“Aerialists and Giant Flowers” from Elizabeth Barrett

In Assistantship, Carpentry, Internship, Scenic Design, Scenic Paint, Scenic Painting, Scenic Props, Technical Direction, Uncategorized on May 23, 2017 at 6:08 AM

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This week was incredibly busy as we approached tech week for the Elizabethan productions. This means the shop was split between installing pieces in the Lizzy and constructing finishing touches back at the shop. I spent a lot of my time working on the mechanical marvels that are The Merry Wives flowers that bloom mid-production. This has been a crossover between the properties department and scenic carpentry and everyone had been involved. Thus, I have been able to work alongside OSF’s talented prop’s department making human sized flowers bloom.

This weekend I attended at Aerialist showcase at The Le Cirque Center. Several OSF employees are Aerialist’s and showcased their work at the scene shop party in April. I was amazed by their performances so I attended another one yesterday. I love how many artists in OSF branch out for their specific fields through venues like The Le Cirque Center, The Open Mic Night, and Midnight Projects. It allows theater artists, who almost always have more than one specialty, the ability to continue to grow in all areas they are passionate about. This specific performance had over 12 Aerialists demonstrate acrobatic skills on silks, ropes, hoops, and bars. It was mildly terrifying to watch them in the air doing acrobatic tricks and suddenly dropping and catching themselves at the last moment. I would highly recommend going to see a show there!

“Week 3 Update” from Elizabeth Barrett

In Carpentry, Green Show, Internship, Scenic Design, Scenic Paint, Scenic Painting, Scenic Props, Uncategorized, Welding on April 18, 2017 at 11:33 PM

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This week I started working on the construction of Merry Wives of Windsor. The shop works at a staggered pace with different productions being built simultaneously. We are currently constructing Merry Wives alongside Beauty and the Beast and it has been intriguing to see both being built alongside each other. Throughout this process, as a scenic carpentry intern, I have been able to work alongside different carpenters as we move from project to project. Construction techniques vary depending on each person, thus I have gained many tips and advice from each person I work with. The Merry Wives set uses the beautiful Lizzie theater as inspiration and builds on to that with more doorways and embellishments. Despite my continued struggle to insure everything is square, I am proud of the work I have done this week on the construction of the main doorway for Merry Wives. It is satisfying to construct something that gets to belong onstage alongside the work of extremely talented carpenters, designers, and theatre artists.

This week I also attended the Hip-Hop Open Mic night at the Black Swan. It was an amazing event and a good introduction to the Ashland community. Everyone involved was incredibly warm and welcoming and those performing at the open mic all shared wonderful work. The performers read stories, performed songs they had written, and read poetry. It was a wonderful way to connect with the OSF community outside of the main theatres. I look forward to going again on May 8th!

“Graduate School…How? When? Where? WHY?!” from Cassandra del Nero

In Assistantship, Carpentry, Props, Richard L. Hay Fellowship, Scenic Design, Scenic Paint, Scenic Painting, Scenic Props, Technical Direction, Uncategorized on April 12, 2017 at 12:08 PM

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As I sit in the OSF Shuttle three nights a week, sometimes driving company members home and sometimes whiling away the hours with memorizing songs and honing my drawing skills- I decided I should at least attempt to be productive in that time frame.

What it has amounted to is this: research for future assistantships, job offers for young designers, and graduate school possibilities.

What I found first was the need to set my priorities: What did I want from a program?

My number 1 priority was a school that looked at design with a scenographic or at least dual emphasis process. This would allow students to pursue more than one avenue of design and to learn more about the cohesive nature of collaboration.

My second priority was that the school also teach classes in builds (scenic and costume) to better inform the design process. If one does not understand how something is built- it can be easy to stray into the impossible (or extremely expensive). This has been doubly enforced to me as I discuss Off the Rails with Richard, and Unison with Rick. As we design (and assist in designing) these shows, we must compare them with the demands of the build. For instance, if a unit is built at 8 ‘-6” wide, but the plank lines for the wall are at 1’-0” increments, there will be a very visible divide at the location of the door. This is not aesthetically pleasing. This is just one of many such examples where we must discuss the function of a scenic unit before it is even passed underneath the eyes of the Technical Direction team.  With those ideals as my jumping off point- I’ve found a few options. And they’re no slouch! NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, Yale’s Department of Drama, Northwestern’s Stage Design Degree, London’s Central School of Speech and Drama, Trinity College’s School of the Arts- and a few others. The uniting factors here? All excellent schools, and with wonderful reputations, and all with staging costs in attendance and moving fees.

The options I did find for attendance on the West Coast face the same failings, but often did not have teaching assistantships available. As such, I’m beginning to plan for attending graduate school in 2018 or 2019, giving me more time to decide what and how I want to learn… It begins!

“Spraying and Relocating!” from Randy Wong-Westbrooke

In Assistantship, Scenic Paint on May 27, 2015 at 11:31 PM

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This last week has been full of new things. Scenic art is full of so many tricks and techniques to achieve the faux finishes and textures we create onstage. To recreate the texture and sheen of a rod iron fence, we mixed graphite with black paint and applied the gloppy mixture onto the wooden cutout. Once dry, you’d sand away and most of the graphite remains giving that sheen. A coat of sealer is needed unless you want the graphite to rub off on everyone’s hands and costumes.

Next with my final design for the Juneteenth Banner getting approved on Friday, we started to mix colors and put them into air powered paint spray guns. I only worked with a spray gun once last summer at Cal Shakes, but I will say that I hardly remember anything. There are a lot of bits and pieces to keep track of when assembling the gun and a few knobs that control the amount of air being used, the amount of paint, and the nozzle. It will definitely take practice. Next we learned out to square a drop on the paint frame – also a new tool and method. Because the banner is long, but narrow, we got a feel for how to spray on paint evenly on the excess muslin underneath the final.  However, even before we started on the final we had to learn how to drive the lifts. Having not driven a car in nine months it was hard to get back into it with no help from the joystick controls. Once we were lined up though, I will say I was more comfortable spraying than driving.

This project is on hold until I return after this week. For the main season set pieces, the paint shop has not been overwhelmed the last couple weeks and my charge, Gabriel, has set me up with Rick Anderson in the Scenic Design Studio to help him with some model boxes. I also haven’t built any model boxes in about eight-nine months so I was nervous. I was expecting him to say this is how I want you to build a ¼” model of the Bowmer, but instead he gave me the printouts and two already built, yet slightly different older boxes to compare with. I was free to go about it however I wanted and that is liberating, yet also nerve wracking. It took some getting used to being in a different space without the tools I’m familiar with. I did discover, however, that the larger shell of the theater is fairly similar to the proscenium stage we have back at Ithaca College, minus the proscenium part obviously. Today I will probably be working on making the clouds above the stage and the walls with boxes for lighting on the sides of the theater. It’s really neat to look around at Richard Hay’s immense collection of art, history, theater, and design books filling up the shelves around me while I hold some glued pieces together to dry. Let’s hope I’m keeping up a good pace!

“It Begins” from K. Jordan

In Assistantship, K Jordan, Scenic Paint on January 16, 2014 at 9:10 AM

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Hello folks, this is Jordan! I’m the newest Scenic Paint Assistant in the scene shop. While I most recently lived in Anchorage, AK, I’m originally from Southern California. I attended the Theatre Academy at Los Angeles City College where I realized painting was my preferred contribution to theatre. I’ve worked at several theatres throughout Los Angeles and its surrounding areas but where I truly honed my skills was at the Pacific Conservatory for the Performing Arts in Santa Maria, CA. There I interned for two summers and a fall season. If you’re ever in central California, it’s definitely a must-see!

It’s my first week here and I’ve jumped right in. We’re currently working on the set of The Cocoanuts. Some of my co-workers and I have been working on the flooring and I’m loving the colors we’re using: peach, yellow, and green – very Florida! Pictured here is the floor in-progress: the beginnings of a palm tree, a sun, some lettering and peach diamonds along the edges. It’ll surely be a great escape from the cold when it opens.

In my time here so far, I love Ashland! I really enjoy being able to not only walk to work (exercise!) but the ability to walk to so many places around town. I’m also very pleased with the variety of restaurants there are! The co-op is especially fun to explore. There are quite a few interesting shops ranging from music, books, and clothing. Seems there’s always something new to discover and friendly people to enjoy it with.

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